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Port Orange Observer Tuesday, Sep. 3, 2019 3 months ago

Hurricane Dorian weakens to Cat 3, will move 'dangerously close' to the Florida east coast late Tuesday

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A slow north-northwestward motion is expected to begin the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 3. A turn to the north is forecast by the evening of Wednesday, Sept. 4, followed by a turn to the north-northeast the following morning.
by: Ray Boone Sports Editor

After maximum sustained winds were recorded over 180 mph on Monday, Sept. 2, Hurricane Dorian has since deteriorated to a Category 3 storm with sustained winds of about 120 mph, according to the latest advisory by the National Hurricane Center.

The storm is stationary just north of Grand Bahama Island. A slow north-northwestward motion is expected to begin the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 3. A turn to the north is forecast by the evening of Wednesday, Sept. 4, followed by a turn to the north-northeast the following morning.

The hurricane will move "dangerously close" to the Florida east coast late Tuesday through Wednesday evening.

Dorian is expected to remain a powerful hurricane during the next couple of days, with hurricane-force winds extending outward up to 45 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extending outward up to 160 miles. 

Devastating hurricane conditions continue on Grand Bahama Island. Hurricane conditions are expected within the Hurricane Warning area in Florida by this evening. Hurricane conditions are possible in the Hurricane Watch area beginning Wednesday. 

Conditions in Flagler and Volusia counties will deteriorate Tuesday with gales moving up the coast strengthening to tropical storm force winds late Tuesday night.

Tropical Storm Force Winds are expected with a time frame overnight Tuesday into Wednesday. Large 15 to 20-foot breakers will impact the beaches Tuesday and Wednesday, causing significant beach erosion, which is already occurring. Significant storm surge inundation of 4 to 7 feet is likely along the Atlantic Coast and Intracoastal Waterway. Additional surge is likely along lakes and rivers connected to the St. Johns River, including Haw Creek and Dead Lake.

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